Indonesian ambassador escorts Paralympic team departing for Indonesia

Indonesian Ambassador to Japan Heri Akhmadi escorted the Indonesian Paralympic team departing for Indonesia at the Tokyo Haneda Airport.

Athletes returning to the country comprised two para-table tennis athletes David Jacobs and Komet Akbar as well as two para-shooting athletes, Bolo Triyanto and Hanik Puji Hastuti. They were accompanied by para-table tennis team coach Bayu Widhie Hapsara Purba, para-shooting team coach Aris Hariyadi, and official Ajeng Widha Paramitha.

On the occasion, Akhmadi lauded the hard work and achievements of the athletes at the Tokyo 2020 Paralympics.

“The Indonesian Embassy in Tokyo lauds the athletes’ struggle in the 2020 Tokyo Paralympics,” Akhmadi noted in a written statement received by ANTARA here on Saturday. The embassy presented a certificate of appreciation and two multi-trip Jakarta-Tokyo tickets to bronze medalist David Jacobs, facilitated by Pertamina.

“The Indonesian Embassy in Tokyo, supported by State-Owned Enterprises (BUMN), gave away ticket prizes to medal winners, so they can visit Japan again and become our guests,” according to Akhmadi, who was accompanied by Head of the Social and Cultural Information Function Meinarti Fauzie and the Immigration Attache of the Indonesian Embassy in Tokyo, Marina Magdalena Harahap.

The embassy also handed out souvenirs to the seven members of the Indonesian contingent that returned to their homeland.

Meanwhile, Pertamina Acting Vice President Stakeholder Relations Rifky Rahman, via a video call, lauded and congratulated David Jacobs and the Indonesian Paralympic Team for their achievements and hard work during the Paralympics. “Pertamina too lauds the Olympic and Paralympic medalists. Hopefully, this form of appreciation would provide enthusiasm and motivation to David Jacobs and the entire Indonesian Paralympic team,” Rahman stated.

Jacobs secured a bronze medal in the men’s para-table tennis event on Saturday, August 29, 2021.

Jacobs, born in Makassar on June 21, 1977, is one of Indonesia’s leading para-table tennis athletes. The athlete, who has been playing table tennis since the age of 10, has made Indonesia proud at various international championships. He bagged his first gold medal at the 2001 Seattle Pacific Table Tennis Club (SEATTA) Games in Singapore as well as bronze medals at the 2012 London Paralympics and Tokyo 2020 Paralympics.

Source: Antara News

Susanto-Oktila pair inches closer to securing Tokyo Paralympic gold

Indonesia’s para-badminton national team boosted victory prospects to win gold at the Tokyo Paralympics after its fourth contenders, Hary Susanto-Leani Ratri Oktila, cleared the final round in the SL3-SU5 mixed doubles on Saturday.

The Susanto-Oktila pair won the semi-finals against Indians — Pramod Bhagat and Palak Kohli — with a score of 21-3, 21-15, according to the Tokyo Paralympic official records.

The pair, ranked first at the world level, played the game with elan. Oktila played in the front zone, with high tempo, to not leave any room for the opponents to move.

In the opening game, Bhagat-Kohli only scored three points until the end of the game.

However, stiff competition was apparent in the second game when Bhagat-Kohli strategized to counter. Susanto-Oktila played slower at the start of the second game, giving the mixed doubles pair leeway to turn things around.

The moments of seizing points were intense. Susanto-Oktila, who scored 4-3, trailed behind Bhagat-Kohli, at 8-11, during the first interval.

Susanto-Oktila, who realized their follies, altered their strategy by focusing on attack and defence.

Oktila was more agile in front of the net to attack, while Susanto played at the back to handle a high lob. Both players stayed focused on maintaining their positions until the end of the game.

Their strategy finally yielded positive results for Indonesia. It did not take long for the pair to get back in control and led at 17-15.

According to records, Bhagat-Kohli committed two blow errors in a row before the game was declared done after 20 minutes.

In the top notch zone, Susanto-Oktila will compete with French para-athletes: Lucas Mazur- Faustine Noel. In the bronze medal match, Bhagat-Kohli will play against Japanese pair Fujihara Daisuke-Sugino Akiko.

The final round and bronze medal match will be held on Sunday, September 5, 2021.

Source: Antara News

NTT cricket athletes train online for PON National Games XX

Cricket athletes have undergone online training for competing at the PON National Games XX in Papua, chairwoman of the Provincial Board of the Indonesian Cricket Association of East Nusa Tenggara (NTT), Inche Sayuna, has said.

“During the COVID-19 pandemic, our cricketers continued to train online under the guidance and mentoring of coaches,” Sayuna said when contacted by ANTARA here on Saturday.

The online training was organized considering that the country, especially the East Nusa Tenggara province, is still in the grip of the COVID-19 pandemic, she informed.

However, the pandemic situation has not dampened the spirit of cricketers to continue training, she remarked. They have continued to practice even in the absence of face-to-face meetings, she added. “So, the athletes undergo self-training at their respective venues, but are monitored directly by coaches who are connected online,” Sayuna said.

She revealed that the online training has been implemented for about two months, and is now gradually starting to be done directly and centered in the cricket field owned by Widya Mandira Kupang University.

“Fourteen East Nusa Tenggara cricket athletes will compete in the PON National Games XX,” she said. They will be accompanied by two coaches and one manager, she added. The athletes and officials have been vaccinated against COVID-19, and they are currently in excellent health to go to Papua on September 21, 2021, Sayuna said.

“We will depart first because the cricket competition will be held earlier together with football on September 25, while the opening of PON XX is on October 2,” she informed.

The Indonesian National Sports Committee (KONI) said last week that sporting venues for Papua’s PON National Games XX, scheduled from October 2-15, 2021, are ready, with only minor finishing touches required at some places.

“In general, out of our target, preparations for the PON sporting venues have reached 95-percent completion, with minor finishing touches necessary at some places to complete the process,” KONI chairperson Marciano Norman noted in a statement.

Source: Antara News

2020 Paralympics: Indonesia bags silver, bronze in SU5 men’s singles

The Indonesian para-badminton team clinched two medals in the SU5 men’s singles at the 2020 Tokyo Paralympics on Saturday afternoon, with Dheva Anrimusthi snatching one silver medal and Suryo Nugroho pocketing one bronze medal.

In the final match, Anrimusthi was defeated by Malaysian athlete Cheah Liek Hou by a tight margin of 17-21, 15-21.

Anrimusthi, whose rank was above Hou, had to face a patience-draining match as his opponent consistently hit cross shots, forcing him to run after the shuttlecock.

When Anrimusthi started to slacken, Hou delivered hard smashes that were difficult to block. The strategy was used throughout the match.

Meanwhile, both players took turns pursuing points, with Anrimusthi equalizing the score at least twice during the match.

In the first game, when he was left behind at 13-15, he managed to raise the score to 16-15. However, his high lob went out of line, making the score even. Hou scored two straight points next and reclaimed the lead by 16-18.

After this point, the Indonesian athlete could only add one more point until the game ended 17-21.

Meanwhile, in the second game, he managed to earn two consecutive points and led 14-13 after being left behind.

However, he made another mistake, and Hou managed to take over the game to score 14-15.

During the match, it seemed that the advantage held by the 2019 BWF World Champion did not last long as it only left a difference of one or two points, making it easy for Hou to catch up.

Finally, after 50 minutes of play, Anrimusthi had to submit to the dominance of his opponent, earning a silver medal for the Indonesian contingent.

Meanwhile, his compatriot, Suryo Nugroho, lost to Fang Jen Yu from Taiwan with a score of 21-16, 21-9.

Earlier, Nugroho had been defeated by Anrimusthi in the semi-final match which took place on Saturday morning.

Source: Antara News

Oktila-Sadiyah clinch Indonesia’s first gold at 2020 Paralympics

Leani Ratri Oktila and Khalimatus Sadiyah secured the first gold medal for Indonesia at the 2020 Tokyo Paralympics by winning the SL3-SU5 women’s doubles para-badminton final on Saturday night (Japan Standard Time).

They defeated China’s Cheng He Fang and Ma Hui Hui with a score of 21-18, 21-12 at the Yoyogi National Stadium in Tokyo, Japan.

It was a historic win for the world’s number one SL3-SU5 women’s doubles players as it was the first gold medal for the Indonesian contingent in the sporting event as well as for the para-badminton national team in their Paralympics debut.

Oktila and Sadiyah played casually in the first game while taking advantage of weaker shots from their opponents to make lucrative returns.

Meanwhile, the second game went tougher as they were left behind at the beginning of the game by three points at 4-7.

However, the persistence and cooperation of the Indonesian players paid off as they took over the game to score 11-9 at the interval.

After this juncture, they consistently maintained the lead and proved unstoppable. They continued to accumulate points to increase the scoring gap.

Finally, after 32 minutes of play, Oktila and Sadiyah became the first Indonesian SL3-SU5 women’s doubles players to win a gold medal at the biggest multi-sports event in the world. Meanwhile, in the match for the third place in the women’s doubles competition, Japan’s Noriko Ito and Ayako Suzuki defeated France’s Lenaig Morin and Faustine Noel with a score of 21-16, 21-18.

With Oktila and Sadiyah’s win, Indonesia got its sixth medal at the event. Earlier, Indonesia had won two silver and three bronze medals.

The two silvers were bagged by Ni Nengah Widiasih in the 41-kg class women’s powerlifting event and Dheva Anrimusthi in the SU5 men’s singles badminton competition.

Meanwhile, men’s T37 100 m running athlete Saptoyoga Purnomo, men’s individual class 10 table tennis athlete David Jacobs, and SU5 men’s single badminton player Suryo Nugroho had pocketed one bronze each.

Source: Antara News

Some 592 Bangka residents yet await PCR test results

The Bangka COVID-19 Task Force recorded that some 592 residents were still awaiting the results of laboratory-conducted PCR tests as of Saturday, September 4.

“A total of 592 residents are awaiting the results of the PCR tests from the regional laboratory, which is the result of tracking and tracing conducted by the health team for residents known to have come in close contact with COVID-19 patients,” Bangka District COVID-19 Task Force spokesperson Boy Yandra stated in Sungailiat on Saturday.

Yandra noted that the residents of eight sub-districts were awaiting their PCR test results owing to an increase in the number of COVID-19 cases in those areas.

“It is estimated that the results of regional laboratory tests can only be known after five days to a week on account of the high numbers tested from other areas in Bangka Belitung Islands Province,” he pointed out.

Yandra expects the results to come negative, so that the number of COVID-19 cases would dip. The spokesperson noted that the local government, through the Health Office, had continued to take preventive measures, such as by maximizing vaccination services for children aged 12 years and above up to the elderly populace.

“The COVID-19 Task Force Team, comprising the National Defense Force, Police Force, and volunteers, also conducted massive monitoring activities for the disciplined implementation of health protocols in some of the public places,” he remarked.

A total of 8,997 COVID-19 cases were so far found in Bangka District. Some 8,009 patients had recovered, while 317 COVID-19 patients had succumbed to the disease.

Of the eight sub-districts in Bangka District, Sungailiat Sub-district, recorded the maximum number of cases at 3,642, with 3,312 patients having made a recovery, and 105 patients having succumbed to the disease. The lowest case count was recorded in Bakam Sub-district at 125, of which 104 recovered, while seven died.

Source: Antara News

Governor Baswedan urges public not to forge vaccine certificates

Governor of Jakarta, Anies Baswedan, has urged people living in the capital city not to falsify COVID-19 vaccine certificates warning this would invite strict sanctions from the authorities.

“Yes, please don’t do that, this is a humanitarian matter. Also, it is easier to get a vaccine than to forge a vaccine certificate,” Baswedan remarked while reviewing the administration of the third dose of vaccinations at Fatmawati Hospital here on Saturday.

According to him, COVID-19 vaccinations are currently very easy to obtain. Meanwhile, those who found forging vaccine certificates would have to pay for parties who fabricate it, he said.

“Coming to a vaccination place anywhere is free and simple,” he highlighted.

He also urged the public not to obtain vaccine certificates illegally because the government has provided vaccination services that are open at all times at affordable costs.

“Getting the forged vaccine certificates is a hassle, but getting the vaccine alone is convenient. Why would you obtain the fake ones (vaccine certificate)?” Baswedan asked. Earlier, the Metro Jaya police arrested two alleged counterfeiters selling fake COVID-19 vaccination certificates online linked to the pedulilindungi.id application. They have been identified as HH (30) and FH (23).

“The modus operandi is that the alleged perpetrator has access to population data. The perpetrator also has access to P-Care and cooperates with his partner to sell it to the public,” Metro Jaya Police chief inspector general Fadil Imran explained at Metro Jaya Regional Police here.

Imran revealed that the case came to light after officers found a Facebook account under the name of Tri Putra Heru that offered the services of fabricating vaccination certificates without getting inoculated but integrated with the pedulilindungi.id application.

“During communication with the account, it was discovered it traded vaccine certificates without inoculation and can be connected to pedulilindungi.id with the price of one vaccine certificate costing Rp320 thousand,” he informed.

Source: Antara News

Two films offer a peek into future of climate change

For science fiction buffs, two Hollywood movies could offer an insight into the latest report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), which has raised the specter of high impact climate events and biodiversity collapse. Film enthusiasts may be familiar with the thrilling scene in The Perfect Storm (2000), when Captain Frank William ‘Billy’ Tyne Jr., played by George Clooney, and ship crew Robert ‘Bobby’ Shatford, played by Mark Wahlberg, desperately try to turn their ship, Andrea Gail, to save themselves from a huge wave caused by a storm north of the Atlantic ocean.

Although the crew succeed, they are eventually swallowed by a much larger wave to be never found.

The film, an adaptation of a non-fiction book by Sebastian Junger (1997), retells a true story about a fishing ship from Gloucester, Massachusetts, United States, in 1991. The ship was lost at sea after the Grace Storm hit the Atlantic Ocean.

Yet the term “perfect storm” apparently does not point at a singular meteorological phenomenon.

The formation of the ‘perfect storm’ immoralized in the movie involved a large high-pressure system moving from the direction of cold Canada towards the coast of New England and eventually meeting a slow-moving warm low-pressure system, forming a cyclone known as Nor’easters.

The cyclone absorbed the energy from Hurricane Grace south of it, which was actually starting to weaken but leaving warmth and moisture behind.

The combination of cold and warm temperatures, plus the humidity from the remnants of the storm, amplified the powerful cyclone and turned it into the “perfect storm” of November 1, 1991. The Boston National Weather Service noticed a buoy located 97 kilometers west of where the Andrea Gail was last seen to have recorded a wave height of 22 meters in 10 hours, when the extra tropical cyclone’s intensity was rapidly increasing. Peak wind speeds were recorded at 120 kilometers per hour.

The United States National Climate Data Center pegged the material losses from the three-day storm at more than US$200 million, or around Rp390 billion (in 1991, US$1 was roughly equal to Rp 1,950). All the damage was due to waves that reached up to 10 meters in height, which struck the east coast of North America.

Hundreds of homes were destroyed in Massachusetts. More than 38 thousand people lost access to electricity and 13 lives were lost in the disaster.

Another film The Day After Tomorrow (2004), which was inspired by Art Bell and Whitley Strieber’s The Coming Global Superstorm (1999), portrays the horrors of another type of climate catastrophe: the cracking of the Larsen Ice Shelf in the Antarctic Peninsula.

The most terrifying part of the film is when Jack Hall, the protagonist (played by actor Dennis Quaid), who is a paleoclimatologist must save himself and his unconscious partner from flash freezing while trapped at the center of a superstorm. They survive after making it to a restaurant and starting a fire.

Sam, the son of Jack Hall (played by Jake Gyllenhall), does the same thing when he and his partner run back into the warm room they create in the New York Public Library to save themselves from flash freezing when the same superstorm moves right above them. The temperature falls to minus 101 degrees Celsius in a very fast time, freezing everyone and everything in a matter of seconds.

The explanation of the incident was already presented by Jack Hall at the beginning of the film, when he presented the hypothesis of his research in front of world leaders at a climate change conference in India. He found evidence buried 10 thousand years in the polar ice caps that the concentration of greenhouse gas emissions showed that the warming that occurred at that time had actually pushed Planet Earth into an Ice Age that could last for two centuries.

Scientists’ worries

The two films, The Perfect Storm and The Day After Tomorrow, were invoked during the socialization of the IPCC Sixth Assessment Report (AR6) from Working Group I titled ‘Climate Change 2021: the Physical Science Basis’, held by the Directorate General of Climate Change Control of Environment and Forestry Ministry on August 31, 2021.

It is no easy feat to convey the message of the IPCC report, which is the result of an assessment of 14 thousand scientific publications from researchers around the world, to the public. Dozens of global scientists, who are members of the IPCC Working Group I, raised concerns regarding the condition of the Atlantic overturning circulation (AMOC) during the preparation of the report, deputy chair of IPCC Working Group I, Prof. Edvin Aldrian, said.

“In the IPCC report, what was mentioned was not the weakening of ARLINDO (Indonesian sea circulation and mixing), but what the IPCC feared was that Atlantic meridional overturning circulation, or the circulation of warm currents facing the European continent, which gives a sense of coolness in the summer, is expected to cause a shutdown,” Aldrian informed.

Through their report, IPCC scientists have tried to bring up cases of low livelihoods but resulting in high impact events, the meteorologist and climatologist from the Agency for the Assessment and Application of Technology (BPPT) explained. Meanwhile, one other issue that IPCC is slowly starting to address is the loss of forest function in the Amazon, South America as a carbon sink, he added.

“It’s even included in the ‘summary for policymakers’. That’s what is described by rare events but heavy impacts,” he added.

The report states that since the 1950s, sea surfaces have been warming faster in the Indian Ocean and in the Western Boundary Currents, she noted. Meanwhile, ocean cycles have caused a slowdown in surface warming or cooling in the Southern Ocean, the equatorial Pacific, the North Atlantic, and the coastal upwelling system, she added.

Nurhati said that IPCC scientists have projected that 83 percent of Earth’s sea surface would warm during the 21st century under any scenario. Heat waves that occur within the sea have also grown more frequent and last a long time, she noted. This is a threat to biodiversity because it would be gradually more difficult to recover, especially coral reefs, she added.

Both the ice sheet mass in Antarctica and Greenland will continue to slip away in the 21st century under any scenario, thus contributing to a global sea level rise by 2100, she added.

As a result of rising sea levels, extreme natural events will occur more frequently. What usually happens every thousands of years will happen in just a span of a hundred years, and what usually happens every hundred years will occur in just decades, she informed.

Chairman of the Indonesian Climate Change Control Advisory Council (DPPPI), Sarwono Kusumaatmadja, called the explanation of the IPCC scientists from Indonesia ‘a scenario of a perfect storm’. Currently, it is necessary to carry out mitigation and adaptation, he said. Humans living in the 21st century live in a world full of threats and uncertainty, and their survival instincts are being tested, he added.

Kusumaatmadja said that the “perfect storm” is going hand-in-hand with the COVID-19 pandemic and other disruptions everywhere, and that is the challenge of the future. What the IPCC reports will be helpful in roadmap creation and changing behavior in the midst of a “perfect storm” that sees no end anytime soon, he remarked.

The COVID-19 pandemic, climate change, and the threat of biodiversity collapse are challenges to make humans more resilient, he said. They also serve as an opportunity for humans to learn from past mistakes and improve themselves to respect nature, he added. They should no longer have the pretense of conquering or manipulating nature, he remarked. The report states that since the 1950s, sea surfaces have been warming faster in the Indian Ocean and in the Western Boundary Currents, she noted. Meanwhile, ocean cycles have caused a slowdown in surface warming or cooling in the Southern Ocean, the equatorial Pacific, the North Atlantic, and the coastal upwelling system, she added.

Nurhati said that IPCC scientists have projected that 83 percent of Earth’s sea surface would warm during the 21st century under any scenario. Heat waves that occur within the sea have also grown more frequent and last a long time, she noted. This is a threat to biodiversity because it would be gradually more difficult to recover, especially coral reefs, she added.

Both the ice sheet mass in Antarctica and Greenland will continue to slip away in the 21st century under any scenario, thus contributing to a global sea level rise by 2100, she added.

As a result of rising sea levels, extreme natural events will occur more frequently. What usually happens every thousands of years will happen in just a span of a hundred years, and what usually happens every hundred years will occur in just decades, she informed.

Chairman of the Indonesian Climate Change Control Advisory Council (DPPPI), Sarwono Kusumaatmadja, called the explanation of the IPCC scientists from Indonesia ‘a scenario of a perfect storm’. Currently, it is necessary to carry out mitigation and adaptation, he said. Humans living in the 21st century live in a world full of threats and uncertainty, and their survival instincts are being tested, he added.

Kusumaatmadja said that the “perfect storm” is going hand-in-hand with the COVID-19 pandemic and other disruptions everywhere, and that is the challenge of the future. What the IPCC reports will be helpful in roadmap creation and changing behavior in the midst of a “perfect storm” that sees no end anytime soon, he remarked.

The COVID-19 pandemic, climate change, and the threat of biodiversity collapse are challenges to make humans more resilient, he said. They also serve as an opportunity for humans to learn from past mistakes and improve themselves to respect nature, he added. They should no longer have the pretense of conquering or manipulating nature, he remarked.

Source: Antara News