Category Archives: Food & Beverage

UPDATE: McDonald’s Becomes the First Restaurant Company to Set Approved Science Based Target to Reduce Greenhouse Gas Emissions

Company Expected to Prevent 150 Million Metric Tons of Emissions by 2030

OAK BROOK, Ill., March 20, 2018 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Today, McDonald’s announces it will partner with franchisees and suppliers to reduce greenhouse gas emissions related to McDonald’s restaurants and offices by 36% by 2030 from a 2015 base year in a new strategy to address global climate change. Additionally, McDonald’s commits to a 31% reduction in emissions intensity (per metric ton of food and packaging) across its supply chain by 2030 from 2015 levels. This combined target has been approved by the Science Based Targets initiative (SBTi).

Through these actions, McDonald’s expects to prevent 150 million metric tons of greenhouse gas emissions from being released into the atmosphere by 2030. This is the equivalent of taking 32 million passenger cars off the road for an entire year or planting 3.8 billion trees and growing them for 10 years. The target will enable McDonald’s to grow as a business without growing its emissions.

“To create a better future for our planet, we must all get involved. McDonald’s is doing its part by setting this ambitious goal to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to address the challenge of global climate change,” said Steve Easterbrook, McDonald’s President and CEO, who announced the plan in a video released by the company. “To meet this goal, we will source our food responsibly, promote renewable energy and use it efficiently, and reduce waste and increase recycling.”

To reach its target, McDonald’s will work across its supply chain, offices and restaurants to be more innovative and efficient through improvements such as LED lighting, energy efficient kitchen equipment, sustainable packaging, restaurant recycling, and by elevating and supporting sustainable agriculture practices. In collaboration with thousands of franchisees, suppliers and producers, McDonald’s will prioritize action on the largest segments of its carbon footprint: beef production, restaurant energy usage and sourcing, packaging and waste. These segments combined, account for approximately 64% of McDonald’s global emissions.

Building on the momentum of existing programs on forests, agriculture and energy efficiency, McDonald’s and its partners will continue to identify practical solutions to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and bring them to scale. In its commitment to transparency, McDonald’s will expand its measurement systems, and annually communicate about progress, challenges and milestones.

“Environmental progress doesn’t just happen, it takes bold leadership from all of us,” said Fred Krupp, President of Environmental Defense Fund. “As one of the best known brands on the planet, McDonald’s is well positioned to lead, and its ambitious new climate target will inspire innovation, collaboration, and most importantly critical greenhouse gas reductions across the company’s global operations and supply chain.”

McDonald’s work to care for the planet and communities spans nearly three decades, including the establishment of a groundbreaking partnership with Environmental Defense Fund (EDF) on packaging and waste reduction. More recently, in 2014, McDonald’s released an Energy and Climate Position Statement, establishing the company’s view on taking effective, collaborative action to tackle climate change. Additionally, in 2015, McDonald’s developed a Commitment on Forests that addresses supply chain impacts on deforestation. This strengthened the foundation of the company’s climate strategy as deforestation accounts for an estimated 15% of global greenhouse gas emissions.

“McDonald’s footprint touches all parts of the world. Their announcement matters because it commits one of the world’s biggest companies to deliver, with the full breadth of their food chain system, significant emissions reductions based on science. It also coincides with their decision to join the We Are Still In coalition with thousands of other companies across the US,” said Carter Roberts, President and CEO of World Wildlife Fund (WWF) in the United States. “While private-sector actions can’t entirely solve the climate crisis facing our planet, significant announcements like these, and coalitions like these working on climate together, create momentum and movement toward the scale of solutions that we ultimately need.”

The launch of this science based target is the latest step in McDonald’s journey to drive meaningful change and use its Scale for Good.

“McDonald’s is delivering a strong statement by becoming the first restaurant company to set a science-based greenhouse gas emissions target. McDonald’s leaders understand that you don’t have to grow emissions to grow as a company,” said Andrew Steer, President & CEO, World Resources Institute (WRI), one of the Science Based Targets initiative partners. “By working with suppliers to design and scale more sustainable farming practices and reducing waste, McDonald’s will chart a path that is better for its franchise, customers and the environment. WRI urges McDonald’s to look for additional opportunities to align their business model and value chain with the realities of a resource-constrained world. We stand ready to support the company in pursuing strategies that lead to healthier consumers and a more sustainable planet.”

The Science Based Targets initiative (SBTi) is a collaboration between WRI, WWF, CDP (formerly the Carbon Disclosure Project) and the United Nations Global Compact, which helps companies determine how much they must cut emissions to do their part to address climate change.

Building on years of engagement with the beef industry, McDonald’s released its 2020 goals for beef sustainability in 2017. These laid out the next steps for collaboration with beef producers and industry partners to proactively identify, share and scale beef production’s most sustainable practices. Already in 2018, McDonald’s launched new packaging and recycling goals and strengthened its commitment to support families.

About McDonald’s
McDonald’s is the world’s leading global foodservice retailer with over 37,000 locations in 120 markets around the world. Over 90 percent of McDonald’s restaurants worldwide are owned and operated by independent local business men and women.

MEDIA CONTACT

Terri Hickey, 773-655-3035
terri.hickey@us.mcd.com

McDonald’s Becomes the First Restaurant Company to Set Approved Science Based Target to Reduce Greenhouse Gas Emissions

Company Expected to Prevent 150 Million Metric Tons of Emissions by 2030

OAK BROOK, Ill., March 20, 2018 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Today, McDonald’s announces it will partner with franchisees and suppliers to reduce greenhouse gas emissions related to McDonald’s restaurants and offices by 36% by 2030 from a 2015 base year in a new strategy to address global climate change. Additionally, McDonald’s commits to a 31% reduction in emissions intensity (per metric ton of food and packaging) across its supply chain by 2030 from 2015 levels. This combined target has been approved by the Science Based Targets initiative (SBTi).

Through these actions, McDonald’s expects to prevent 150 million metric tons of greenhouse gas emissions from being released into the atmosphere by 2030. This is the equivalent of taking 32 million passenger cars off the road for an entire year or planting 3.8 billion trees and growing them for 10 years. The target will enable McDonald’s to grow as a business without growing its emissions.

“To create a better future for our planet, we must all get involved. McDonald’s is doing its part by setting this ambitious goal to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to address the challenge of global climate change,” said Steve Easterbrook, McDonald’s President and CEO, who announced the plan in a video released by the company. “To meet this goal, we will source our food responsibly, promote renewable energy and use it efficiently, and reduce waste and increase recycling.”

To reach its target, McDonald’s will work across its supply chain, offices and restaurants to be more innovative and efficient through improvements such as LED lighting, energy efficient kitchen equipment, sustainable packaging, restaurant recycling, and by elevating and supporting sustainable agriculture practices. In collaboration with thousands of franchisees, suppliers and producers, McDonald’s will prioritize action on the largest segments of its carbon footprint: beef production, restaurant energy usage and sourcing, packaging and waste. These segments combined, account for approximately 64% of McDonald’s global emissions.

Building on the momentum of existing programs on forests, agriculture and energy efficiency, McDonald’s and its partners will continue to identify practical solutions to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and bring them to scale. In its commitment to transparency, McDonald’s will expand its measurement systems, and annually communicate about progress, challenges and milestones.

“Environmental progress doesn’t just happen, it takes bold leadership from all of us,” said Fred Krupp, President of Environmental Defense Fund. “As one of the best known brands on the planet, McDonald’s is well positioned to lead, and its ambitious new climate target will inspire innovation, collaboration, and most importantly critical greenhouse gas reductions across the company’s global operations and supply chain.”

McDonald’s work to care for the planet and communities spans nearly three decades, including the establishment of a groundbreaking partnership with Environmental Defense Fund (EDF) on packaging and waste reduction. More recently, in 2014, McDonald’s released an Energy and Climate Position Statement, establishing the company’s view on taking effective, collaborative action to tackle climate change. Additionally, in 2015, McDonald’s developed a Commitment on Forests that addresses supply chain impacts on deforestation. This strengthened the foundation of the company’s climate strategy as deforestation accounts for an estimated 15% of global greenhouse gas emissions.

“McDonald’s footprint touches all parts of the world. Their announcement matters because it commits one of the world’s biggest companies to deliver, with the full breadth of their food chain system, significant emissions reductions based on science. It also coincides with their decision to join the We Are Still In coalition with thousands of other companies across the US,” said Carter Roberts, President and CEO of World Wildlife Fund (WWF) in the United States. “While private-sector actions can’t entirely solve the climate crisis facing our planet, significant announcements like these, and coalitions like these working on climate together, create momentum and movement toward the scale of solutions that we ultimately need.”

The launch of this science based target is the latest step in McDonald’s journey to drive meaningful change and use its Scale for Good.

“McDonald’s is delivering a strong statement by becoming the first restaurant company to set a science-based greenhouse gas emissions target. McDonald’s leaders understand that you don’t have to grow emissions to grow as a company,” said Andrew Steer, President & CEO, World Resources Institute (WRI), one of the Science Based Targets initiative partners. “By working with suppliers to design and scale more sustainable farming practices and reducing waste, McDonald’s will chart a path that is better for its franchise, customers and the environment. WRI urges McDonald’s to look for additional opportunities to align their business model and value chain with the realities of a resource-constrained world. We stand ready to support the company in pursuing strategies that lead to healthier consumers and a more sustainable planet.”

The Science Based Targets initiative (SBTi) is a collaboration between WRI, WWF, CDP (formerly the Carbon Disclosure Project) and the United Nations Global Compact, which helps companies determine how much they must cut emissions to do their part to address climate change.

Building on years of engagement with the beef industry, McDonald’s released its 2020 goals for beef sustainability in 2017. These laid out the next steps for collaboration with beef producers and industry partners to proactively identify, share and scale beef production’s most sustainable practices. Already in 2018, McDonald’s launched new packaging and recycling goals and strengthened its commitment to support families.

About McDonald’s
McDonald’s is the world’s leading global foodservice retailer with over 37,000 locations in 120 markets around the world. Over 90 percent of McDonald’s restaurants worldwide are owned and operated by independent local business men and women.

MEDIA CONTACT

Terri Hickey, 773-655-3035
terri.hickey@us.mcd.com

First World Coffee Producers Forum plots roadmap to deal with common challenges

An Action Plan to be developed with specific goals, the conduction of an independent study, and the formation of a Committee with wide representation of different links of the global coffee chain stand out among the final resolutions adopted by the Forum, which ended Wednesday

MEDELLIN, Colombia, July 13, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — The first World Coffee Producers Forum, which brought together representatives of the whole coffee value chain, concluded this Wednesday with a Final Declaration that includes an Action Plan to face common challenges, among other specific measures.

The Action Plan, to be developed co-responsibly by stakeholders of the global value chain and with the support of the International Coffee Organization (ICO), must set concrete goals, the time period to meet them, and the required funding.

This Action Plan must be based on the problems faced by the coffee sectors of different regions in the world, namely: low prices and excessive volatility for producers (with larger profits remaining in the other links of the chain), adaptation to climate change, scarce workforce, reduced generational change and producers’ precarious social conditions.

Taking into account the recommendations made in the Forum, the Action Plan will also be based on a study to be conducted by an independent body to analyze the behavior of coffee prices in the last 40 years, production costs in this same period, and their correlation.

The study will analyze if international coffee prices, both at the New York and London stock exchanges, reflect the reality of the physical market, and will present alternative solutions to the problems discussed in the Forum.

The Final Declaration resolved that a co-responsible commitment to implementing the Action Plan and funding it must be achieved at the highest level with representatives of the industry, donors, international cooperation, multilateral organizations, and national and local governments.

For the actions to be developed, a Committee will be formed, made up of two representatives of producer associations from African countries; two from Mexico, Central American and Caribbean countries; two from South American countries and two from Asian ones, and at least one representative of the industry in each of the following regions: North America, Europe and Asia.

The Committee shall submit a progress report in the next meeting of the ICO’s International Coffee Council, to be held in March 2018.

The next World Coffee Producers Forum will take place in 2019, and the Committee will coordinate its venue; aside from the resolutions, Brazil offered its territory to host the next Forum.

“We have just started a new process in the world coffee sector,” said Roberto Velez, CEO of the Colombian Coffee Growers Federation (FNC, the host organization). “Today we finished a reflection, assembling ideas, a process of listening each other, but it is only the beginning of what we hope is a new stage.”

Velez even raised the possibility that this new way of understanding, collaboration and co-responsibility between producers and consumers, this new North-South relationship between developed and developing countries, may set the course towards a new global economic history.

Among the assumptions that gave rise to these resolutions are critical profitability and even losses for coffee farmers due to low international prices, low productivity, higher production costs related to climate change and variability, and rising labor costs, including harvesting ones.

This lower profitability has resulted in a significant percentage of coffee producers living in poverty or at least with lower quality of life (housing, utilities, education, health, etc.), and lower capacity to reinvest in their farms.

Without corrective actions to address these problems in a coordinated way and their financing, the world may face a structural reduced coffee supply, unable to meet the demand, which in turn will create undesirable imbalances in the coffee market that may put at risk sustainability of the global chain.

The spirit of the Final Declaration took into account the main conclusions and recommendations of the Forum, perfected with an active participation of delegates in thematic groups organized for their analysis and discussion.

The Forum was addressed by figures of international stature such as former US president Bill Clinton, University Professor Jeffrey D. Sachs, the ICO Executive Director, José Sette; the presidents of Colombia, Costa Rica and Honduras, agricultural ministers, and representatives of the whole coffee value chain, including producers.

Contact Information:
Colombian Coffee Growers Federation
Martha Sánchez
Corporate Communications Director
Prensa.FNC@cafedecolombia.com
(57+1) 3136600 Ext. 1790

Mérieux NutriSciences Relocates Canadian Food Testing Laboratory

Food Testing Lab Expands Offerings in Burnaby, British Columbia

BURNABY, British Columbia, May 11, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Mérieux NutriSciences, a leading international network of accredited food testing laboratories, announced today that it has moved one of its four Canadian food testing labs to a new, 24,000 square foot facility, just miles from its former location in Burnaby, British Columbia. The actual move, which took place on Saturday, April 22nd, signifies the growth in offerings and the ability to enhance Mérieux NutriSciences’ microbiological testing capabilities in the Vancouver area, including the upper northwest region of the United States.

A photo accompanying this announcement is available at http://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/c85cbfb7-61b9-4072-8d18-006200946e39

“The new Burnaby lab will give us the ability to enhance our analytical testing, especially for micro. We will be able to offer even more capabilities now, including tests such as E. coli 0.157, and will have the space to introduce additional rapid methods for detecting Salmonella and Listeria in raw and processed products. The lab’s new layout will also be able to support a more efficient sample flow and provide room to expand our chemistry capabilities,” states Mérieux NutriSciences President for North America, Jim Miller.

With a continued focus on protecting consumer health, Mérieux NutriSciences takes pride in being an industry leader in food safety and quality. “To understand our customers’ needs is to understand where the industry is headed,” says Miller. “The feedback we were getting from our customers had a lot of influence on our decision for this move.”

The new lab in Burnaby is one of four Mérieux NutriSciences labs in Canada, and one of twenty-one labs in all of North America. The Burnaby location presently caters to the dietary supplements, meat and poultry, fish and seafood, fruit and vegetables and processed foods industries. However, with the new space, the company expects to be able to expand their current capabilities to reach a wider array of customers by late fall.

Mérieux NutriSciences’ officials visited the lab for a ribbon cutting ceremony on Monday, May 8th, and hope to celebrate with a open house, inviting customers to tour the lab, in early September.

Mérieux NutriSciences is dedicated to protecting consumers’ health throughout the world,
by delivering a wide range of testing and consulting services to the food & nutrition,
agrochemicals, pharma and cosmetics industries.

Headquartered in Chicago, Mérieux NutriSciences has grown from a single laboratory founded in Chicago in 1967 to a global presence
throughout North, Latin and South America, Europe, 
Middle-East, Africa and Asia Pacific.

Present in 21 countries, Mérieux NutriSciences employs 6,500 people worldwide working in close to 100 laboratories.
Visit www.merieuxnutrisciences.com/us for more information.

Contact:
Susan Rubin, Director of Marketing 
susan.rubin@mxns.com

Sizing up the ‘short’ Pinoys

Did you know that Filipino shortness is not a racial or a genetic trait? It is true. Filipinos are short because of the impact of poverty and malnutrition on generations of Filipino children. Populations grow in height, and they can grow quickly when stable growing economies address and reduce poverty and improve nutrition for children. But when poverty is pervasive and access to food limited, populations will stay short and can actually shrink.

Did you know that the average height of Singaporean men is 5’7, versus slightly less than 5’4 for Filipino men? Singaporeans are not genetically taller than Filipinos, yet the average height of men in Singapore has increased by more than an inch in the last 10 years. The Philippine population is currently tied for the second shortest in Southeast Asia with Vietnam, and just ahead of Indonesia. All the other Asean countries have taller populations.

Why are Filipinos short? In the Philippines, 30 percent of all children under the age of 5 are stunted or short for their age, which is an improvement from any previous time in its history. Regardless, hundreds of years of widespread poverty and malnutrition have led to high levels of childhood stunting. Being stunted means that a child has been chronically malnourished during the critical growth period, the first 1,000 days of life: from conception through the second birthday.

To be a stunted child means that you will not achieve your physical growth potential, but more importantly, you will not achieve your cognitive potential.

We know that poverty creates the conditions leading to stunting in children, but stunting keeps children in poverty for their entire lives.

There are 3.6 million stunted children in the Philippines today-the ninth highest number of any country in the world. There are many sub-Saharan African countries that have lower percentages of stunted children than the Philippines. In fact, Mindanao has 40 percent childhood stunting, which is the average for all of sub-Saharan Africa. The Autonomous Region in Muslim Mindanao is the region with the highest level of stunting in the entire country: 63 percent of all children. Almost two-thirds of all children in the ARMM are stunted, which is equal to stunting in Ethiopia. This is not a theoretical problem; this is a nutritional emergency.

Today, 1.5 million Filipino children will wake up in the morning and go to bed at night without having anything to eat the entire day.

Today, 2.7 million Filipino children will miss a meal because the family didn’t have enough money for three meals.

Almost half of all preventable child deaths (approximately 27,000 per year) in the Philippines have malnutrition as the underlying cause, yet this is never mentioned on any death certificate.

A recent Save the Children Philippines report, titled Sizing Up the Stunting and Malnutrition Problem in the Philippines, documents why height matters. The report finds that height is a proxy indicator of how well the Philippines is doing as a society to reduce childhood poverty and improve access to nutrition. If the Philippines is to progress economically, we must not leave the poorest children behind.

A minimum wage earner in Metro Manila spends P151 to feed a family of five per day, and yet approximately P459 a day is needed to cover three daily meals that will ensure them a balanced diet. For most workers making minimum wage in Metro Manila, it is nearly impossible to keep a family of five well-nourished.

With the upcoming elections, we need strong political will and public awareness to ensure that no child dies or suffers from hunger and malnutrition. The proposed First 1,000 Days Act pending at the health committees of the Senate and the House of Representatives aims to address this concern. There is broad civil-society support for the immediate passage of this bill that will tackle undernutrition among children aged two years and below, and nursing mothers, by scaling up the provision of nutrition supplements, vaccinations and checkups, and promotion of exclusive breastfeeding, maternal nutrition and appropriate complementary feeding.

To date we have not heard of a clear agenda among candidates addressing the prevalence of malnutrition. We hope the candidates will declare their proposed solutions to childhood stunting and finally put an end to intergenerational transmission of poverty.

Candidates, please make a stand that as president you will support the proposed First 1,000 Days Act and prioritize reducing stunting and improving nutrition nationwide. All children have the right to fair and equal access to nutritious food, and this is something that we should expect from any future administration.

It is time to rethink Filipino shortness.