Daily Archives: September 16, 2018

2018 Online Journalism Awards winners include The Washington Post, The Marshall Project and Reveal from the Center for Investigative Reporting

AUSTIN, Texas, Sept. 16, 2018 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Superlative reporting on gun violence, government accountability and endangered wildlife led coverage that garnered top honors for 28 media organizations Saturday night at the 2018 Online Journalism Awards, which closed the Online News Association Conference.

At the 18th annual awards dinner, The Marshall Project, ProPublica and The Washington Post each took home a $5,000 General Excellence in Online Journalism award, courtesy of the Gannett Foundation. The Trace and Postdata.club were named winners of the new Micro newsroom category of the General Excellence award, sponsored by the Democracy Fund. The $15,000 University of Florida Awards for Investigative Data Journalism were won by ProPublica and The Florida Times-Union’s “Walking While Black” and The Guardian US for “Bussed Out: How America Moves its Homeless.”

The Knight Award for Public Service, with a $5,000 prize from the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation, went to Reveal from The Center for Investigative Reporting for “All Work. No Pay.” Trint won the $5,000 Gannett Foundation Award for Technical Innovation in the Service of Digital Journalism for its automated transcription tool. KUT Austin, Miami Herald and The New York Times were recognized in the Breaking News categories.

Two new award categories were added this year. The award for Excellence in Collaboration and Partnerships recognizes newsrooms and companies who have formed partnerships or collaborations to cover a topic or story with a digital focus. AJ+ Español, Animal Político and Pop-Up Newsroom shared the Excellence in Collaboration and Partnerships award for their impressive reporting in “Verificado 2018.” The ONA Community Award celebrates an individual whose contributions have transformed digital journalism, particularly by creating the kind of environment that inspires and enables journalists to do their best work. OpenNews Director Erika Owens is the inaugural recipient of the ONA Community Award.

ONA also honored documentary photographer and freelance photojournalist Nicole Tung as the recipient of the 2018 James Foley Award for Conflict Reporting for her powerful coverage of social issues and conflict in the Middle East, Asia and Africa, and her work as a dedicated advocate for freelancers’ rights and safety. Former ONA Executive Director Jane McDonnell was honored with the 2018 Rich Jaroslovsky Founder Award for her outstanding leadership, commitment to promoting excellence in digital journalism and dedication to the Online News Association.

The event was emceed by host of NPR Illinois’ The 21st, Niala Boodhou, along with several special presenters. In total, 35 awards were given out, with prize money totalling $58,500.

Here are the winners in each category:

General Excellence in Online Journalism, Micro Newsroom (tie)
Postdata.club
The Trace

General Excellence in Online Journalism, Small Newsroom
The Marshall Project

General Excellence in Online Journalism, Medium Newsroom
ProPublica

General Excellence in Online Journalism, Large Newsroom
The Washington Post

Knight Award for Public Service
All Work. No Pay., Reveal from The Center for Investigative Reporting

Breaking News, Small Newsroom
Austin Serial Bombings, KUT Austin

Breaking News, Medium Newsroom
Collapse of the Florida International University Bridge, Miami Herald

Breaking News, Large Newsroom
The Vegas Massacre, The New York Times

Gannett Foundation Award for Technical Innovation in the Service of Digital Journalism
Trint

Explanatory Reporting, Small Newsroom
Dangerous Deliveries, The Texas Tribune

Explanatory Reporting, Medium Newsroom
Dirty Gold, Clean Cash, Miami Herald

Explanatory Reporting, Large Newsroom
The Wall, The Arizona Republic/USA TODAY NETWORK

Online Commentary
Nicholas Kristof and Colleagues, The New York Times

Feature, Small Newsroom
Californians: Here’s Why Your Housing Costs Are So High, CALmatters

Feature, Medium Newsroom
Project Nora, The Oregonian/OregonLive

Feature, Large Newsroom
A Betrayal, ProPublica and New York Magazine

Sports, Large Newsroom
The Winter Olympics, The New York Times

The David Teeuwen Student Journalism Award, Small
Leaving Tracks: The Capture of Wolf No. 1553, Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication (Arizona State University)

The David Teeuwen Student Journalism Award, Large
Aftermath, UNC School of Media and Journalism

Pro-Am Student Award
Troubled Water, Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication (Arizona State University) and Carnegie-Knight News21

The Al Neuharth Innovation in Investigative Journalism Award, Small Newsroom
Digging into the Mining Arc, InfoAmazonia and Correo del Caroní

The Al Neuharth Innovation in Investigative Journalism Award, Medium Newsroom
Trump Town, ProPublica

The Al Neuharth Innovation in Investigative Journalism Award, Large Newsroom
Betrayed: Chicago Schools Fail to Protect Students from Sexual Abuse and Assault, Leaving Lasting Damage, Chicago Tribune

Excellence and Innovation in Visual Digital Storytelling, Small Newsroom
The Last Generation, FRONTLINE and The GroundTruth Project

Excellence and Innovation in Visual Digital Storytelling, Large Newsroom
The Uber Game, The Financial Times

The University of Florida Award for Investigative Data Journalism, Small/Medium Newsroom
Walking While Black, The Florida Times-Union and ProPublica

The University of Florida Award for Investigative Data Journalism, Large Newsroom
Bussed Out: How America Moves its Homeless, The Guardian US

Excellence in Audio Digital Storytelling, Small Newsroom
The New American Songbook, The GroundTruth Project

Excellence in Audio Digital Storytelling, Large Newsroom
Prosecutor Nisman Phone Interceptions Mapped in Playlists, LA NACION (Argentina)

Excellence in Immersive Storytelling
Yemen’s Skies of Terror, Al Jazeera Contrast

Excellence in Collaboration and Partnerships
Verificado 2018, AJ+ Español, Animal Político and Pop-Up Newsroom

2018 Rich Jaroslovsky Founder Award
Jane McDonnell, Former ONA Executive Director

2018 ONA Community Award
Erika Owens, Director of OpenNews

2018 James Foley Award for Conflict Reporting
Nicole Tung, Independent photojournalist

The awards ceremony, which was live-streamed directly from the JW Marriott Austin, is available at awards.journalists.org/live.

A group of 132 industry-leading journalists and new media professionals, led by ONA Board members and OJA Co-Chairs P. Kim Bui and David Smydra, teamed up to screen entrants and select finalists. Over 25 judges, representing a diverse cross-section of the industry, then conferred to determine winners from independent, community, nonprofit, major media, start-up and international news sites.

Launched in 2000, the OJAs are administered by ONA and are the only comprehensive set of journalism prizes honoring excellence in digital journalism, focusing on independent, community, nonprofit, major media and international news sites.

About ONA
The Online News Association is the world’s largest association of online journalists. ONA’s mission is to inspire innovation and excellence among journalists to better serve the public. Membership includes journalists, technologists, executives, academics and students who produce news for and support digital delivery systems. ONA also hosts the annual Online News Association Conference and administers the Online Journalism Awards.

About Knight Foundation
Knight Foundation is a national foundation with strong local roots. We invest in journalism, in the arts, and in the success of cities where brothers John S. and James L. Knight once published newspapers. Our goal is to foster informed and engaged communities, which we believe are essential for a healthy democracy. For more, visit knightfoundation.org.

About the Gannett Foundation
The Gannett Foundation is a corporate foundation sponsored by Gannett Co., Inc. whose mission is to invest in the future of the communities in which Gannett does business, and in the future of our industry. It supports projects that take a creative approach to fundamental issues such as education and neighborhood improvement, economic development, youth development, community problem-solving, assistance to disadvantaged people, environmental conservation and cultural enrichment.

About the University of Florida College of Journalism and Communications
The University of Florida College of Journalism and Communications is driving innovation and engagement across the disciplines of advertising, journalism, public relations and telecommunication. The strength of its programs, faculty, students and alumni — in research and in practice — has earned the college ongoing recognition as one of the best in the nation among its peers. The college offers bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral degrees and certificates, both online and on campus. The college’s strength is drawn from both academic rigor and experiential learning. The college includes seven broadcast and digital media properties and the nation’s only chair in public interest communications.

About Journalism 360
Journalism 360 is a global network of storytellers accelerating the understanding and production of immersive journalism. Our mission is to help news organizations, journalists, technologists, content creators and journalism educators experiment with all forms of immersive storytelling, including but not limited to 360 video, augmented reality, virtual reality and mixed reality. Its founding partners are the Knight Foundation, Google News Initiative and the Online News Association.

About Democracy Fund                               
The Democracy Fund invests in social entrepreneurs working to ensure that our political system is responsive to the public and able to meet the greatest challenges facing our nation. To learn more visit DemocracyFund.org.

Contact: Online News Association, awards@journalists.org

Australian Special Forces to Help Secure APEC Summit

SYDNEY Australian warships, aircraft and special forces soldiers will help safeguard the security of world leaders at November’s APEC (Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation) in Papua New Guinea (PNG). It will be the first time a Pacific Island country has hosted the summit.

Defense officials have confirmed that elite Australian Army units are in Papua New Guinea amid concerns the impoverished nation’s military is not adequately equipped to properly secure the APEC summit.

World leaders including U.S. Vice President Mike Pence, Russia’s President Vladimir Putin, and the Chinese President Xi Jinping are all expected to attend the two-day gathering in November.

There are fears that cruise ships that will provide temporary accommodation in PNG’s notoriously dangerous capital, Port Moresby, could be vulnerable to attack by terrorists.

Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison has confirmed his country’s massive military effort to provide security at the APEC summit, but the final costs of the contribution have not been revealed.

As you can expect with so many world leaders coming together the security and other arrangements that need to be in place need significant support. Our support to Papua New Guinea in hosting APEC has been in the works now for 12-18 months, he said.

Australian police have also been training and equipping local law enforcement officers.

Australian navy patrols have undertaken drills with Papua New Guinean forces as part of Exercise Paradise.

Royal Australian Navy Commander John Cowan was satisfied with the joint maneuvers.

Can I say that the PNG defense force maritime element has shown itself to be a very very capable organization and certainly, I think, well prepared to meet the challenges ahead, he said.

Papua New Guinea is a South Pacific nation that lies to the east of Indonesia. It is Australia’s nearest neighbor with a population of around 7 million people. Most rely on agriculture for their livelihoods.

The Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) was set up in 1989. It has 21 members working towards greater regional economic integration, including enhancing the role of women in business and promoting the use of digital technology. It also addresses food security as well as threats to regional stability.

Source: Voice of America

Australian Special Forces to Help Secure APEC Summit

SYDNEY Australian warships, aircraft and special forces soldiers will help safeguard the security of world leaders at November’s APEC (Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation) in Papua New Guinea (PNG). It will be the first time a Pacific Island country has hosted the summit.

Defense officials have confirmed that elite Australian Army units are in Papua New Guinea amid concerns the impoverished nation’s military is not adequately equipped to properly secure the APEC summit.

World leaders including U.S. Vice President Mike Pence, Russia’s President Vladimir Putin, and the Chinese President Xi Jinping are all expected to attend the two-day gathering in November.

There are fears that cruise ships that will provide temporary accommodation in PNG’s notoriously dangerous capital, Port Moresby, could be vulnerable to attack by terrorists.

Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison has confirmed his country’s massive military effort to provide security at the APEC summit, but the final costs of the contribution have not been revealed.

As you can expect with so many world leaders coming together the security and other arrangements that need to be in place need significant support. Our support to Papua New Guinea in hosting APEC has been in the works now for 12-18 months, he said.

Australian police have also been training and equipping local law enforcement officers.

Australian navy patrols have undertaken drills with Papua New Guinean forces as part of Exercise Paradise.

Royal Australian Navy Commander John Cowan was satisfied with the joint maneuvers.

Can I say that the PNG defense force maritime element has shown itself to be a very very capable organization and certainly, I think, well prepared to meet the challenges ahead, he said.

Papua New Guinea is a South Pacific nation that lies to the east of Indonesia. It is Australia’s nearest neighbor with a population of around 7 million people. Most rely on agriculture for their livelihoods.

The Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) was set up in 1989. It has 21 members working towards greater regional economic integration, including enhancing the role of women in business and promoting the use of digital technology. It also addresses food security as well as threats to regional stability.

Source: Voice of America

News feature – Tobacco control should not be a mission impossible by Andi Abdussalam

Jakarta (ANTARA News) – People have been consuming tobacco or smoking cigarettes since time immemorial, but global efforts have been made to protect people after the medical world found it to be dangerous to health.

Yet, the global effort is like a mission impossible as tobacco is not only a threat to health but also a commodity that helps generate the economy where the interference of the cigarette industry into the government in Asian countries is so great.

The World Health Organization (WHO) has adopted the Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (FCTC) as part of the efforts to eliminate the ill effects of tobacco on human health. The FCTC also is initiated by developing countries of the WHO members and was agreed in 2003.

Ironically, Indonesia, which is one of the initiators along with Latin America, India, and Thailand, has yet to accede to the convention.

The governments hesitance to ratify the convention is viewed as odd, especially during a time when 180 countries in the world have acceded to the FCTC, realizing the importance of controlling tobacco consumption.

Southeast Asia Tobacco Control Alliance (SEATCA) Senior Advisor Mary Assunta stated that the cigarette industrys intervention in the governments of Asian countries was quite high.

“Japan, Bangladesh, and Indonesia are the three countries with the highest cigarette industry intervention index in Asia,” Assunta noted at a press conference at the 12th Asia Pacific Conference on Tobacco and Health (APACT12th) in Nusa Dua, Bali, on Friday.

The Indonesian government has yet to accede to the convention as over six million people earn a livelihood as workers in tobacco industries or as tobacco farmers. Tobacco also contributes to trillions of rupiah in taxes to the state.

Tobacco is a big source of income in Indonesia. There are about 6.1 million people working in the tobacco industries. Ratifying the convention will kill them.

Admittedly, cigarettes contribute huge taxes to the state. In 2012 and 2013, for example, the country received at least Rp84 trillion and Rp85 trillion, respectively, in tobacco taxes. The figures rose to Rp112.5 trillion and Rp139.5 trillion, respectively, in 2014 and 2015.

In 2010, tobacco taxes were worth Rp63 trillion and drastically rose over 100 percent to Rp139.5 trillion in 2015. This is about eight percent of the revenues in the 2015 state budget.

So, from an economic point of view, tobacco is a source of revenue for the state and income for millions of people, which is why the government has not yet ratified the Framework Convention on Tobacco.

However, it is also a fact in the field that smokers continue to increase in numbers.

Indonesian Minister of Empowerment of Women and Child Protection Yohana Yambise has expressed concern over the increasing number of children taking to smoking in the country.

“A total of 54 percent of Indonesian children are now smokers,” she noted after a limited cabinet meeting on the Framework Convention on Tobacco Control led by President Widodo in Jakarta two years ago.

Therefore, tobacco is like an epidemic that traps younger generation. The tobacco industry, of course, targets the younger generations to maintain the survival of its business.

Chairman of the 12th Asia Pacific Conference on Tobacco or Health (APACT) Arifin Panigoro emphasized that the tobacco trap is a real threat that all nations of the world need to watch out for.

“Tobacco is a threat to our children, teenagers, and nation,” Panigoro remarked at the opening of the 12th APACT in Nusa Dua, Bali, on Wednesday.

Panigoro stated that several countries in the world had applied strict tobacco control rules to protect children and adolescents as the future of the nation.

Hence, tobacco control activists from 29 Asia-Pacific countries are in Nusa Dua to attend the 12th APACT to do more to protect children and adolescents from the threat of the tobacco epidemic.

“People from 29 countries are present not just to discuss but to also act,” Panigoro noted.

According to Panigoro, civil society and the governments of countries of the world must act to control tobacco to encourage the ban on advertising, promotion, and sponsorship of cigarettes, and the imposition of high taxes on tobacco, among others.

“In Indonesia, the price of cigarettes is a quarter of the price in Malaysia,” he pointed out.

APACT was first held in Taipei, Taiwan, in 1989. The last meeting was held in Beijing, China, in 2016.

According to Yembise, Indonesia has faced numerous challenges in tobacco control to protect children from its negative effects.

“It is disappointing, as many Indonesian children smoke. We have to do something,” Yembise remarked during the 12th Asia Pacific Conference on Tobacco or Health (12th APACT) in Nusa Dua, Bali, on Thursday.

Based on the cigarette industrys internal documents, the minister noted that the industry had targeted teenagers to become beginner smokers. Young people, who smoke, are contributors to the tobacco industrys revenue.

By targeting children to become beginner smokers, the tobacco industry has violated childrens rights, she affirmed.

“Beginner smokers in Indonesia are getting younger, and the number is increasing,” the minister remarked. Indonesia is the third-largest cigarette consumer after China and Russia.

The 12th APACT was held in Nusa Dua, Bali, and chaired by Panigoro. The host in Indonesia is the National Tobacco Control Committee along with several other tobacco control support organizations.

Source: ANTARA News